Chalice Corals

145 Produkte


  • Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    €99.00

    SKU: G450


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G450

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G450

    €199,00€99,00

  • Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    €99.00

    SKU: G427


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G427

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G427

    €199,00€99,00

  • Chalice Gold Indo Frag M

    Chalice Gold Indo Frag M

    €49.00

    SKU: G418


    Rabatt -38%letzter Artikel! Chalice Gold Indo Frag M

    Chalice Gold Indo Frag M

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G418

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G418

    €79,00€49,00

  • Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    €179.00

    SKU: G397


    Rabatt -28%letzter Artikel! Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G397

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G397

    €250,00€179,00

  • Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    €99.00

    SKU: G380


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G380

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G380

    €199,00€99,00

  • Chalice Frag - G310

    Chalice Frag - G310

    €49.00

    SKU: G310


    Rabatt -51%letzter Artikel! Chalice Frag - G310

    Chalice Frag - G310

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G310

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G310

    €99,00€49,00

  • Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    €99.00

    SKU: G227


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Chalice 24K Aussie Frag M

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G227

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G227

    €199,00€99,00

  • Chalice Frag - G202

    Chalice Frag - G202

    €49.00

    SKU: G202


    Rabatt -51%letzter Artikel! Chalice Frag - G202

    Chalice Frag - G202

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G202

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G202

    €99,00€49,00

  • Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €79.00

    SKU: G139


    Rabatt -47%letzter Artikel! Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G139

    1 auf Lager   SKU: G139

    €149,00€79,00

  • Chalice Frag - E500

    Chalice Frag - E500

    €49.00

    SKU: E500


    Rabatt -51%letzter Artikel! Chalice Frag - E500

    Chalice Frag - E500

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E500

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E500

    €99,00€49,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €99.00

    SKU: E499


    Rabatt -67%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E499

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E499

    €299,00€99,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €149.00

    SKU: E495


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E495

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E495

    €299,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €149.00

    SKU: E494


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E494

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E494

    €299,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €149.00

    SKU: E493


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E493

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E493

    €299,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag
    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €299.00

    SKU: E490


    letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E490

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E490

    €299,00

  • Chalice Frag - E487

    Chalice Frag - E487

    €49.00

    SKU: E487


    Rabatt -51%letzter Artikel! Chalice Frag - E487

    Chalice Frag - E487

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E487

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E487

    €99,00€49,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €159.00

    SKU: E485


    Rabatt -47%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E485

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E485

    €299,00€159,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €149.00

    SKU: E474


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E474

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E474

    €299,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Frag L

    Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Frag L

    €199.00

    SKU: E469


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Frag L

    Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Frag L

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E469

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E469

    €399,00€199,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €159.00

    SKU: E464


    Rabatt -47%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E464

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E464

    €299,00€159,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €99.00

    SKU: E459


    Rabatt -67%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E459

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E459

    €299,00€99,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €119.00

    SKU: E458


    Rabatt -60%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E458

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E458

    €299,00€119,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €119.00

    SKU: E455


    Rabatt -60%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E455

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E455

    €299,00€119,00

  • Chalice Gold Rainbow Frag L - E448

    Chalice Gold Rainbow Frag L - E448

    €149.00

    SKU: E448


    Rabatt -25%letzter Artikel! Chalice Gold Rainbow Frag L - E448

    Chalice Gold Rainbow Frag L - E448

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E448

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E448

    €199,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €129.00

    SKU: E444


    Rabatt -57%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E444

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E444

    €299,00€129,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €129.00

    SKU: E434


    Rabatt -57%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E434

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E434

    €299,00€129,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €149.00

    SKU: E425


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E425

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E425

    €299,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €149.00

    SKU: E424


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E424

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E424

    €299,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €139.00

    SKU: E419


    Rabatt -54%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E419

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E419

    €299,00€139,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €149.00

    SKU: E418


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E418

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E418

    €299,00€149,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €129.00

    SKU: E415


    Rabatt -57%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E415

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E415

    €299,00€129,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €99.00

    SKU: E414


    Rabatt -67%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E414

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E414

    €299,00€99,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €299.00

    SKU: E409


    letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E409

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E409

    €299,00

  • Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Colony

    Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Colony

    €999.00

    SKU: E401


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Colony

    Rainbow Chalice Flaming Sunrise Colony

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E401

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E401

    €1.999,00€999,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €99.00

    SKU: E395


    Rabatt -67%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E395

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E395

    €299,00€99,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €99.00

    SKU: E390


    Rabatt -67%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E390

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E390

    €299,00€99,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €159.00

    SKU: E389


    Rabatt -47%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E389

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E389

    €299,00€159,00

  • Chalice Gold Rainbow Indo Frag L

    Chalice Gold Rainbow Indo Frag L

    €189.00

    SKU: E386


    Rabatt -37%letzter Artikel! Chalice Gold Rainbow Indo Frag L

    Chalice Gold Rainbow Indo Frag L

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E386

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E386

    €299,00€189,00

  • Chalice Frag - E385

    Chalice Frag - E385

    €49.00

    SKU: E385


    Rabatt -51%letzter Artikel! Chalice Frag - E385

    Chalice Frag - E385

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E385

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E385

    €99,00€49,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €159.00

    SKU: E379


    Rabatt -47%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E379

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E379

    €299,00€159,00

  • Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €99.00

    SKU: E368


    Rabatt -50%letzter Artikel! Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Chalice Frag - Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classification can be a murky topic, their impact in the reef aquarium hobby is crystal clear. Chalice corals are one of the most highly desirable large polyp stony corals in the industry. This is due in large part to the colors and patterns chalices are capable of expressing. High-end Chalices often have intensely fluorescent colors and can display striking patterns. Location In terms of their distribution in the wild, chalice corals are found all over the Pacific. Given their broad distribution one would be led to assume that they are readily available in the hobby, but lately that has not been the case. At the time of this recording, there is currently an import/export ban in Indonesia and Fiji where many of these corals come from so most of the specimens available in the trade are being imported out of Australia. Lighting I recommend moderate lighting levels around 100 PAR. Most types of chalice corals are adaptable to different lighting intensities but the first priority should always be “don’t blow away corals with light.” It does not take very long to overexpose chalice corals that can lead to bleaching and a rapid decline in health. It is far better to provide substandard lighting intensity and slowly correct the situation by adjusting the light or placement of the chalice coral RATHER THAN accidentally blasting the coral with too much light and then trying to help it recover after it bleaches. The other reason why I would not be in a huge hurry to go crazy on light is that for the most part, chalice corals are pretty consistent with their coloration. Sure there is always some degree of variability and the occasional outlier that CAN change their color in noticeable ways, but overall there is not a lot to be gained by messing with lighting. I would aim for moderate, consistent light and just let the coral adapt to the lighting conditions on its own. One last point I will mention about lighting is bringing out fluorescence in chalices. Many species of chalice corals are highly fluorescent under actinic blue LED lights and are real show stoppers. Even if you are a die hard metal halide or t5 fan, you are missing out if you haven’t seen chalice corals under full actinic LED illumination. Consider getting just one inexpensive strip for late night viewing. Water Flow Like light, water flow is not something that I would go crazy with. Moderate water movement is recommended. Too little flow and you run the risk of allowing detritus to settle on the colonies which creates dead spots. Several species of chalice corals naturally form a bowl shape and there has to be enough flow to sweep away anything that would otherwise settle in the middle. Too much flow and you run the risk of having the coral fall off the rock work. Their plating shape once again plays a role because if there is a lot of flow, the colony acts like a sail and can lift it off of the rocks and either face down in the substrate or worse yet onto another coral. Feeding Chalices are considered photosynthetic corals meaning they have a symbiotic relationship dinoflagellates living in their flesh called zooxanthellae. Strictly speaking, the zooxanthellae are the organisms carrying out the actual photosynthesis but the coral animal benefits by accessing the byproducts of their photosynthetic activity, namely the simple sugars that are produced. Although chalice corals derive much of their nutritional needs from the byproducts of photosynthesis, they are also capable feeders. Here at WildCorals, we have tried feeding chalices a number of different types of food ranging from frozen foods to pellet foods. Chalices do not have pronounced polyp extension so their feeding response can be difficult to monitor. Typically these corals utilize a mucus coat to capture food and slowly draw it into their mouths which can be seen during feeding time lapses.

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E368

    1 auf Lager   SKU: E368

    €199,00€99,00

  • Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    €179.00

    SKU: E267


    Rabatt -40%letzter Artikel! Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Rainbow Flaming Chalice Frag

    Name: Chalice Coral.Temperature: 24-26C Flow: low-mid PAR: 75-150Water parameters: Nitrate 5-20 mg/l, Phosphate 0,05-0,15 mg/l Feeding: They are adept feeders that can grab and consume a wide variety of foods ranging from coral-formulated sinking pellets to frozen food such as brine shrimp, mysis, and krill. Care level: Moderade Chalice Corals are a broad collection of corals that are loosely jumbled together. Several different genera of corals are represented ranging from Echinopora, Oxypora, Mycedium, and even Lithophyllon. As such, care requirements are going to be generalized more than other corals because these are very different corals that all get lumped in together. Although their exact classificatio